18 Sep 2017

Medicine and the media: short course 25 Nov 2017

Medicine and the media
Copyright: idrutu / 123RF Stock Photo
Medicine and the media
Saturday 25 November 2017
9am - 4:30pm
553 St Kilda Road, Melbourne
Course fee:  $299 (incl GST)

In this one-day interactive course, participants from both academic and journalism backgrounds will work together to identify important barriers in communication of health research to the general public.

15 Sep 2017

Video of the week: Wendy Brown


Professor Wendy Brown describes Monash Department of Surgery research at the Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct (AMREP): video 2:07. See more about the department at: https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/surgery-alfred/home

What's on at CCS 18-22 September 2017


Michael Low is presenting
on  21 Sep 2017
Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.

CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page

See CCS seminar index: www.med.monash.edu.au/cecs/events/seminars.html

What's on at CCS 18-22 September 2017

Tue 19/09/2017 10:00 Department of Diabetes Student Journal Club
11:00 PhD Pre-submission Seminar: Dr Eileen Grace Merriman
Wed 20/09/2017 14:00 Immunology Seminar: Tri Phan
Thur 21/09/2017 11:30 Cutting Edge Journal Club: Michael Low
12:00 The Alfred Grand Round: Susan Biggar, National Engagement Advisor AHPRA
12:00 Dr Max Ortiz Catalan: Osseointegrated implants
Fri 22/09/2017 09:00 Healthcare in a person-centred era: communicating to improve outcomes forum

Neural control of artificial limbs via osseointegrated implants: Dr. Max Ortiz Catalán

Dr Max Ortiz Catalán giving a TED talk on osseointegration. Link
You are invited to attend a Central Clinical School seminar at the AMREP seminar room on Bionic Limbs Integrated to Bone, Nerves, and Muscles.


Dr Max Ortiz Catalán will shed light on how biology and mechatronics can integrate man and machine through intuitive prosthetics, controlled by the mind.

The Alfred’s Mr Frank Bruscino-Raiola Director of Plastic Surgery, Mr Steven Gray, and the Alfred Hospital Osseointegration and Targeted Muscle Reinnervation Team, have helped to pioneer this revolutionary technique which enables amputees to gain better and more natural control of their prosthetic arm. They have strong collaborations with leading centres around the world, including Integrum in Sweden and Rehabilitation Institute in Chicago.

This event is co-hosted by the Plastic Surgery Unit at the Alfred Hospital and the Department of Surgery, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Alfred Centre.

Details:

Dr Ortiz Catalán's research focuses on neural control of artificial limbs via osseointegrated implants. This involves bio-electric signals acquisition and processing, neural interfaces, machine learning, osseointegration, and neurostimulation. He is also interested in the use of virtual and augmented reality for neuromuscular rehabilitation and treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) using myoelectric pattern recognition to decode motor volition.

Dr Ortiz Catalán is leading the development and clinical implementation of the Osseointegrated Human-Machine Gateway. This technology made possible, for the first time, the direct connection of a robotic prosthesis to the patients' bone, nerves, and muscles. He has also developed a novel treatment for phantom limb pain, which is currently under an international clinical investigation. These projects have in common the use of bioelectric pattern recognition (BioPatRec) for the decoding of motor intention. Dr. Ortiz Catalan has made the algorithms necessary for such task available in an open source platform for research and development (BioPatRec). He founded and leads the Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory​​, and he is an Associate Editor for the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation (JNER).

Dr Max Ortiz Catalán is an Assistant Professor at the Biomedical Signals and Systems research unit, and founder of the Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory (@ChalmersBNL). He works in close collaboration with the Centre for Advanced Reconstruction of Extremities (C.A.R.E.) at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, and Integrum AB, both in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Recent CCS publications: 9-15 Sep 2017

Professor David Tarlinton, HOD Immunology and Pathology
has two articles in this week's publications roundup. Recently
published video of David describing the department's research
Recent publications for Central Clinical School affiliated authors in the following departments. Note, browse down this entry for details. Linked headings for each section are to the departments' home pages.
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases (ACBD)
  • Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine (AIRMed)
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Diabetes
  • Gastroenterology
  • Immunology and Pathology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medicine
  • Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre (MAPrc) 
  • National Trauma Research Institute
  • Surgery

Rapid measurement of platelet function moves closer to fruition

2017 Nandurkar group, three of whom are authors on the article
describing their device for measuring platelet function.
by Anne Crawford

Monash and RMIT scientists have edged closer to refining a device that will rapidly measure platelet function in the blood of people with von Willebrand's disease (vWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder in Western populations. The device will also act as a high-throughput screening tool for other blood platelet disorders and new drug discovery.

14 Sep 2017

Enzyme finding is good news for vegetarians with bowel disorder

Legumes, soy milk and nuts may be back on the menu for those
suffering from IBS, thanks to Monash University research.
by Anne Crawford

 A digestive enzyme supplement may hold the key to improving the symptoms suffered by patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) when they eat a carbohydrate commonly found in legumes, soy milk and nuts, according to Monash University research.

Researchers in the Central Clinical School’s Department of Gastroenterology have found that oral α-galactosidase co-ingested with foods high in galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) helps reduce symptoms. IBS is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder affecting one in seven Australian adults, characterised by chronic and relapsing symptoms including lower abdominal pain and discomfort, bloating, wind, distension and altered bowel habits.
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