18 May 2018

Photo of the week: 2018 Day of Immunology Vaccination Cafe

The 2018 Day of Immunology Vaccination Café team. L-R: Dr Evelyn Tsantikos, Dr Jodie Abramovitch, Mr Daniel Thiele, Dr Tim Gottschalk, Ms Lakshanie Wickramasinghe, Dr Craig McKenzie, Mr Samuel De Jong, Ms Angela Nguyen, Dr Katharine Goodall, Ms Isobel Leece, Ms Anisha Ansari.

The Monash University Department of Immunology and Pathology were once again heavily involved in the International Day of Immunology. Providing workshops for secondary students, a vaccination cafe and public lectures, the day aims to raise awareness of the importance of herd immunity and public health. A whopping 648 vaccines were administered on the day, including to Adam Bandt, Greens MP and Jill Hennessy MP, Minister for Health, Victoria!

See photo gallery: https://photos.app.goo.gl/qpdZhPFmoGgcWKx27

In this blog issue, we also feature research in predicting, or not, flu outbreaks, and how a high fibre diet can improve immune response to influenza.

What's on at CCS 21-25 May 2018

Prof Chris Mitchell, Dean of
Faculty, speaking 3.30 pm on
Tues 22 May 2018, AMREP
Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.
CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page.

See CCS seminar index:  https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/headlines/events-calendar

What's on at CCS 21-25 May 2018

Recent CCS publications: 12-19 May 2018

How difficult is it to predict flu incidence? Very. See our feature
Recent publications for Central Clinical School affiliated authors in the following departments. Note, browse down this entry for complete publications list. Linked headings for each section are to the departments' home pages.


  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases (ACBD)
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre (MAPrc)
  • Medicine
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC)
  • Neuroscience
  • Surgery 
  • Flu virus impact: No telling how it will go

    Heatmap of incidence of 2017 flu season, from FluTracking.
    Your participation welcomed in the joint Australia - New
    Zealand flu tracking survey: join here
    by Anne Crawford

    With winter approaching and the influenza (flu) season hovering health authorities and others are wondering if this year’s flu season will be a repeat of the deadly one that occurred last year. It’s a question being asked a lot lately of Professor Allen Cheng, infectious diseases expert at The Alfred Hospital. 

    Indeed, Professor Cheng, who runs part of Australia’s hospital-based flu surveillance system FluCAN, is perennially asked if he can predict what will happen in the upcoming season. His answer is the same every year: no, he can’t.

    16 May 2018

    Fibre in diet linked to flu protection

    Professor Ben Marsland in the lab. Image: CHUV
    It has long been known that a diet rich in fibre improves intestinal health and reduces inflammation in the gut. Now, a Monash University study shows that fibre can protect against the flu virus.

    Professor Benjamin Marsland from the Department of Immunology and Pathology, Central Clinical School, together with Swiss colleagues, showed in mice that fibre fermented in the gut by bacteria countered influenza A, one of the most common viral diseases worldwide.

    The findings, published today in Immunity, suggest that fermented fibre and byproducts of this process called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) could be investigated further for potential use in preventing and treating viral infections including the flu, and possibly as a supplement to improve the efficacy of the flu vaccine.

    Not all fibres are created equally

    Prebiotic fibre in legumes, garlic and onion may be better 
    for your gut than some fruits and vegetables.
    by Matt Jane

    Diets including fibres found in legumes, garlic and onion may hold the key to a healthier gut according to a study conducted by Monash PhD student, Daniel So.

    Through a detailed analysis and review of 64 papers, the study found that the consumption of prebiotic fibres would nourish and increase good bacteria in the gut resulting in a more harmonious digestive system.

    15 May 2018

    Early bird 2 June for Surgical Research Essentials (SuRE) intensive course!

    RACS
    SuRE is accredited by RACS
    Mr James Lee is the Surgical
    Research Essentials  (SuRE)
    course convenor
    Mr James Lee is offering his highly successful intensive course: Surgical Research Essentials (SuRE) for the third year running.

    Register your interest now. Early bird registration discount closing 2 June 2018

    Why do this course?

    A good understanding of surgical research is essential for a surgeon. Good quality research and the ability to apply it clinically is the cornerstone in evidence based practice. In training the surgeons of the future, compulsory research requirements have now been incorporated into every surgical training program. Not only that, research experience and output has become one of the differentiators in many job and training position applications.

    RACP John Snow award for medical student Ned Latham

    
    Medical student Ned Latham presenting at the RACP
    John Snow awards
    Congratulations to Ned Latham, a current Monash medical student, who has won the 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) John Snow Award for his research.

    This annual award goes to the highest ranked student research presentation on public health at the RACP's annual congress.

    Ned's presentation had two parts. The first part presented an evaluation of the acceptability of point-of-care hepatitis C testing for people who inject drugs. For this project, Ned interviewed 19 people who had recently undergone point-of-care hepatitis C testing at needle syringe programs as part of a pilot study run by the Burnet Institute (the Rapid-EC study). The second part of his presentation was a reflection on the value of qualitative research in public health.

    Congratulations to our recently completed PhD students!

    Congratulations Timothy (pictured)
    and Annas!
    Congratulations to our recently completed PhD students, Mr Timothy Gottschalk and Mr Annas Al-Sharea! We wish them well for their future scientific careers.

    14 May 2018

    Participants sought for blood research at ACBD

    Alex Louey donating blood for the
    ACBD research programs.
    We want you - or rather, about 50+ mls of your blood!

    We provide $10.00 to cover the cost of your parking/travel costs.

    If you are available from Tuesday to Friday between 8.30-10.00 am could you please contact Nikki Kara to arrange an appointment time. Email nikki.kara@monash.edu, ph 99030122

     

    Reminder: if you have donated in the last 8 weeks, you are not currently eligible to donate.

    11 May 2018

    Video of the week: A/ Prof Jeremy Grummet "The Australian Revolution in Prostate Cancer Diagnosis"


    The Department of Surgery hosted a public lecture last month (Thursday 26 April 2018), given by Associate Professor Jeremy Grummet, Director of Clinical Research of the Urology Unit at Alfred Health. The lecture looked at "The Australian Revolution in Prostate Cancer Diagnosis."

    Video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZ0QTq9HzmI
    Photo gallery: https://photos.app.goo.gl/MNvYUi9xVGP5j6LX6

    What's on at CCS 14-18 May 2018

    Dr Mark Shulman is giving
    his PhD confirmation seminar
    Thur 17 May
    Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.
    CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page.

    See CCS seminar index:  https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/headlines/events-calendar

    What's on at CCS 14-18 May 2018


    14 May: Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours) information night

    2019 CCS BMedSc(Hons)
    project booklet, see link

    Monday 14 May, 2018 6.00pm to 8.00pm

    Auditorium, Level 4, Green Chemical Futures Building, 13 Rainforest Walk, Clayton Campus
    Come and listen to the presentations by the Monash Faculty Schools on their research expertise and what they can offer to a BMedSc(Hons) candidate. There will be opportunities to meet and discuss research projects with representatives from each school and past BMedSc(Hons) students after the main presentation.

    Recent CCS publications: 5 - 11 May 2018

    Professor Paul Myles is lead researcher on the RELIEF study
    which shows that increased IV fluid improves recovery from

    major abdominal surgery, published 10 May 2018 in NEJM
    Recent publications for Central Clinical School affiliated authors in the following departments. Note, browse down this entry for complete publications list. Linked headings for each section are to the departments' home pages.


  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases (ACBD)
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Gastronenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre (MAPrc)
  • Medicine
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC)
  • Neuroscience
  • Surgery 
  • Monash scientists join race to reveal diet’s secrets

    Monash researchers are checking 
    out ingredients of the Mediterranean 
    diet.
    by Anne Crawford

    The Mediterranean diet is one of the most researched, published and consumed diets on the planet. It’s been associated with health benefits that include delaying Alzheimer’s disease, better heart health, helping to fight certain cancers and reducing our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. But no one is completely sure why.

    Mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence have all pointed to the biological benefits of the diet but the chemical compounds responsible for them remain elusive. Monash scientists are investigating.

    10 May 2018

    More IV fluids during surgery is beneficial: RELIEF study

    Professor Paul Myles, lead researcher of
    the RELIEF study: more IV fluid is good
    A global study led by Monash University and The Alfred has found giving patients more IV fluids during surgery can reduce the risk of kidney damage and wound infection post-surgery, solving a decades-old debate.

    More than 300 million people worldwide undergo major surgery each year, and anaesthetists have fiercely debated whether to give patients more or less IV fluids during surgery and in the days following. Intravenous (IV) fluids – a “saline drip” – are given to patients to counteract extended periods of not being able to drink or eat before and after surgery, and also to restore the circulation if there is excessive bleeding.

    9 May 2018

    Participants sought: Treating the male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis

    Treating regular male partners of women with bacterial vaginosis
    may reduce reinfection rates. Image: MSHC
    Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal condition among women which often comes back even after antibiotic treatment.

    Some of the bacteria associated with BV are present on the genitals of male partners of women with BV. We believe that reinfection from sexual partners may be contributing to the high rates of women getting BV again.

    IF YOU HAVE BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS AND HAVE A REGULAR MALE SEXUAL PARTNER, WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU!

    8 May 2018

    Social media update: Red Lab Coat Day - Vilija Jokubaitis

    Also, Alfred Health has produced a video
    about being a doctor at the Alfred. See:
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHNt8qQdzcs
    MS Research Australia have produced a number of videos in the lead up to World MS Day on 30 May. They are releasing about two per week, almost all of which are featuring Dr Vilija Jokubaitis (seen here at left).


    See MS Research Australia videos at www.facebook.com/MSResearchAustralia/videos/2085434868163778/

    4 May 2018

    Video of the week: Red Lab Coat Day 2018 - Kiss Goodbye to MS

     
    Every year on 1 May 1 research groups throughout Australia participate in Red Lab Coat Day. The day aims to raise the profile of and funding for research on multiple sclerosis organized.
     
    This year your CCS Neuroscience MS researchers have put together a hilarious video for the 'Kiss Goodbye to MS' campaign to raise awareness and funds. The video is part of the 'Battle of the Labs', and Helmut Butzkueven, Vilija Jokabaitis, Mastura Monif, Steven Petratos and Anneke van der Walt would love you to vote for it. They want to win the surprise prize!
     

    Please share the link with all your family, friends and colleagues, ask them to ‘kiss’ (vote) for their favourite and post on your social media using the attached social tiles and the #KissGoodbyeToMS and #RedLabCoatDay hashtags.
     
    See the video and the photo gallery here:
     
     

    What's on at CCS 07-11 May 2018

    PhD student Liriye Kurtovic pre-
    senting at the 2016 CCS 3MT heat.

    Liriye is presenting on Tues 8 May
    Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.
    CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page.

    See CCS seminar index:  https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/headlines/events-calendar

    What's on at CCS 07-11 May 2018


    Invitation to 14 June 2018 Jeffrey Modell Immunodeficiencies launch

    You are invited to the JMF Centre for Primary Immunodeficiencies Melbourne Opening Symposium.

    Invitation link
    https://jmfmelbournelaunch.eventbrite.com.au and input code: JMF18

    3 May 2018

    Recent CCS publications: 28 April – 4 May 2018

    Professor Helmut Butzkueven and Dr Vilija
    Jokubaitis are co-authors on a recent paper
    investigating genetic determinants of the rate
    of disability progression in multiple sclerosis
    Recent publications for Central Clinical School affiliated authors in the following departments. Note, browse down this entry for complete publications list. Linked headings for each section are to the departments' home pages.

  • Diabetes
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Neuroscience
  • Surgery 
  • 1 May 2018

    Monash findings offer hope for new lung disease drug

    Associate Professor Margaret Hibbs' group. There are a number
    of co-authors on the paper which has identified a protein important
    for controlling emphysema. L-R: Dr Evelyn Tsantikos, Ms Cassandra
    Castelino, Ms April Raftery, Associate Professor Margaret Hibbs,
    Mr Tim Gottschalk, Ms Lakshanie Wickramasinghe, Dr Maverick
    Lau, Dr Jess Borger
    by Anne Crawford

    Monash University researchers have identified a critical role for a protein known as G-CSF in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an incurable lung disease often referred to as emphysema.

    COPD is the third most common cause of death worldwide, afflicting 29% of people over 75 in Australia and its incidence is increasing. It responds poorly to current therapies, which have remained largely unchanged for decades.

    The multi-disciplinary research team, led by Associate Professor Margaret Hibbs from the Department of Immunology and Pathology, showed that lung disease and other disease comorbidities such as osteoporosis, heart disease and body wasting failed to develop in an experimental COPD model when G-CSF was “knocked out” genetically. They also demonstrated that G-CSF levels were elevated in the lungs of patients with COPD, suggesting it played a destructive role.

    Participants sought: Effects of dietary resistant starch on serum acetate levels

    The study

    Investigating the dose response effects on palatability, tolerability and serum acetate levels of acetylated high-amylose maize starch (HAMSA) in healthy adults.

    What is the hypothesis?

    Resistant starches such as high amylose maize starch (HAMS) reach the large intestine undigested and are later fermented by the gut microbiota, producing short-chain fatty acids, one of which is acetate. Elevated serum acetate levels are thought to confer health benefits through immune and blood sugar modulation. So far, vinegars have been used to investigate physiological effects of oral ingestion of acetate.

    30 Apr 2018

    Position vacant: Research Scientist

    Miss Heather Cleland (left) and Dr Shiva Akbarzadeh
    (right) work on skin tissue engineering. See more about
    the Skin Bioengineering research group
    Wanted! A research scientist to join a small and active group of scientists committed to translational research in skin tissue engineering at The Victorian Adult Burns Service, The Alfred, collaborating with Monash University scientists in the field. To be successful for this role you will need to have a PhD in cell biology or equivalent and proven experience in primary cell culture and cell biology techniques. Experience in skin biology, wound healing, platelet biology and mouse models are highly desirable. You will require to work independently and in a team and have a proven track record in producing high quality research outcomes and manuscript preparation.

    https://careers.alfredhealth.org.au/job/12422/4XONA904S/research-scientist

    27 Apr 2018

    Photo of the week: Dr Mastura Monif's research group

    2018 Monif group. L-R: Ms Katrina Kan, Mr William O'Brien, Dr Mastura Monif, Dr Robb Wesselingh, Ms Veronica Woo, Dr James Broadley. Dr Monif is one of the research leaders in the new Department of Neuroscience, specializing in neurology, neuroinflammation and neurological diseases. See more about her group at
    www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/neuroscience/research/monif-group
    See more about the department's research at www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/neuroscience/research

    What's on at CCS 30 April-04 May 2018

    Professor Nicola Harris,
    new in the Department of
    Immunology and Pathology,
    is presenting on Weds 2 May
    Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.
    CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page.

    See CCS seminar index:  https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/headlines/events-calendar

    What's on at CCS 30 April-04 May 2018

    Recent CCS publications: 21 – 27 April 2018

    Dr Vilija Jokubaitis, seen here in a preview shot of CCS's Red
    Lab Coat Day video which will be released on 1 May to promote
    awareness of multiple sclerosis research. Vilija is a co-author on
    a recently published paper on how genetic profiles influence
    response to treatment.
    Recent publications for Central Clinical School affiliated authors in the following departments. Note, browse down this entry for complete publications list. Linked headings for each section are to the departments' home pages.
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases (ACBD)
  • Diabetes
  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre (MAPrc)
  • Neuroscience
  • Surgery 
  • Monash study reveals insights into brain injury, blood carbon dioxide levels and hospital deaths

    Professor Ravi Tiruvoipati
    by Anne Crawford

    A large multi-centre study has made an important finding about the relationship between hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide or CO2) in the blood of patients with acute brain injury and hospital mortality. CO2 makes your blood more acidic which, if not adjusted, can affect your outcomes for the worse.
     
    Professor Ravindranath Tiruvoipati, Adjunct Clinical Professor at the Peninsula Clinical School, Monash University and Intensive Care Specialist at Frankston Hospital, Peninsula Health, was first author on the paper, published in JAMA Neurology.  

    Participants sought: Can fibromyalgia be reduced by brain stimulation?

    The Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre (MAPrc) at the Alfred Hospital is currently seeking volunteers for a clinical trial of a non-medication investigational treatment for fibromyalgia (muscle pain).

    Theta Burst Stimulation (TBS) is a painless, safe, and non-invasive means of stimulating nerve cells in the brain. We are conducting this study to see whether we can reduce the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

    20 Apr 2018

    What's on at CCS 23-27 April 2018

    Ethan Oxley is presenting on
    Tues 24 Apr 11 am. Ethan's PhD
    topic is AML tumour suppression
    Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.
    CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page.

    See CCS seminar index:  https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/headlines/events-calendar

    What's on at CCS 23-27 April 2018

    Recent CCS publications: 29 March - 21 April 2018

    
    Pregnant Australian indigenous women are ten (10) times more likely
    to have diabetes Type 2 than non-indigenous women, the PANDORA

    study reports. Image courtesy NACCHO communique
    Recent publications for Central Clinical School affiliated authors in the following departments. Note, browse down this entry for complete publications list. Linked headings for each section are to the departments' home pages.
     
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases (ACBD)
  • Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine (AIRMed)
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Centre for Obesity Research and Education
  • Diabetes
  • Gastronenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre (MAPrc)
  • Medicine
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC)
  • Neuroscience
  • Surgery 
  • Sex, drugs and research: study probes world of ‘chemsex’

    Chemsex can take its toll: health researchers are
    investigating how best to reduce harm and aid recovery. 
    Photo: Diverse Images/UIG via Getty Images
    by Anne Crawford

    A Monash University researcher has focussed international attention on ‘chemsex’ or ‘party and play’, the practice of sexualised drug use by men who have sex with men, in a bid to identify solutions to problems associated with it.

    Journey into new field complements blood research

    High praise from Professor Beverley Hunt! See her tweet
    by Anne Crawford

    An exploratory review of literature about an ancient immune system has taken researchers in the Australian Centre for Blood Disorders (ACBD) into what is for them a new and fascinating world. It has yielded insights into links to their own research into haematological processes, suggested exciting new avenues of investigation and provided fuel for thought about new drugs on the market.

    Sugar, proteins, AGEs and fertility

    A woman’s pre-pregnancy diet could have a greater impact
    on fertility and pregnancy than previously thought.

    Image: Essential Baby 
    by Kristy Sheridan

    A woman’s pre-pregnancy diet could have a greater impact on fertility and pregnancy than previously thought, according to new research by Monash University and Hudson Institute of Medical Research scientists.

    The study found that certain proteins, which become ‘toxic’ after exposure to sugar, trigger inflammation in the womb in infertile women with obesity. This may reduce the likelihood of a woman falling pregnant and could even contribute to pregnancy complications.

    "What's going on down there?" Bacterial vaginosis explained

    A new website with information about bacterial vaginosis
    A new website aimed at raising awareness about common vaginal conditions, 'What's Going On Down There?' www.wgodt.com.au, has recently been launched by researchers at Monash University.   Led by Dr Jade Bilardi (Central Clinical School), in collaboration with researchers from Alfred Health/Monash University (Associate Professor Catriona Bradshaw, Professor Christopher Fairley, Dr Lenka Vodstrcil) and the University of Melbourne (Professor Meredith Temple-Smith),  the website aims to inform women about a relatively unknown vaginal condition - bacterial vaginosis (BV).

    Congratulations to our recently completed PhD students!

    Congratulations to our recently completed PhD students!
    L-R: Yow Keat Tham, Maria Daglas and Dominik Draxler
    Congratulations to our recently completed PhD students, Yow Keat Tham, Maria Daglas and Dominik Draxler! We wish them well for their future scientific careers.

    Dominik Draxler's thesis is titled, "New approaches for traumatic brain injury". Dominik was supervised by Professor Rob Medcalf and Dr Maithili Sashindranath (Australian Centre for Blood Diseases). Dominik is co-author on a very recent paper - see this week's research feature story,
    Journey into new field complements blood research.

    Maria Daglas's thesis is titled, "Investigating the long term effects of TBI [Traumatic Brain Injury] on the immune and fibrinolytic system". She was supervised by Professor Rob Medcalf, Dr Maithili Sashindranath (Australian Centre for Blood Diseases), and Associate Professor Frank Alderuccio (Department of Immunology and Pathology).

    Yow Keat Tham's thesis is titled "Targeting lipids differentially regulated in settings of physiological cardiac hypertrophy and disease". He was supervised by Dr Julie McMullen and Professor Peter Meikle from the Baker Institute.

    Congratulations to Dr Jay Jha on APSN Best Abstract Award!

    Dr Jay Jha receiving his award for best abstract at APCN 2018
    Congratulations to Dr Jay Jha, Department of Diabetes, for his win of the “Best Abstract Award” for the abstract entitled “NOX5 Aggravates Renal Injury in Human Diabetic Kidney Disease” at the joint meeting of 16th Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology (APSN) and 2018 Annual Congress of Chinese Society of Nephrology (CSN) held in Beijing, China.

    Jay presented at the meeting, highlighting how pro-oxidant enzyme Nox5 contributes to the pathology of diabetes associated kidney disease and that targeting this enzyme could be a potential thereapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease.

    18 Apr 2018

    Monash Bioinformatics Platform at CCS and Upcoming Workshops

    Intro to Python Workshop. Data Fluency, March 2018
    The Monash Bioinformatics Platform (MBP) has a representative based within the CCS in the form of Dr Nick Wong. The MBP is one of many research platforms offered by Monash University. Unlike other platforms, the MBP has at it's core, a team of bioinformaticians with a diverse skill-set who are here to facilitate research requiring bioinformatics analysis. While we may not have the expertise you require immediately, we are likely to know researchers that do and could link groups together with common research interests.

    13 Apr 2018

    What's on at CCS 16-20 April 2018

    Amlan Chakraborty is 
    presenting Thu 19 April
    Central Clinical School (CCS) has regular seminar series and postgraduate presentations. Event notices are posted on the CCS Events calendar.

    CCS staff and students can see details of both public and local events (including professional development courses, trade fairs and Graduate Research Student calendars) and deadlines, at the CCS intranet's Announcements page.

    See CCS seminar index:  https://www.monash.edu/medicine/ccs/headlines/events-calendar

    What's on at CCS 16-20 April 2018

    Forthcoming events

    8 Apr 2018

    JDRF One Ride 2018 to fundraise $$ for diabetes research

    Terri Allen is fundraising for JDRF diabetes research. Link
    Terri Allen from the Monash University's Department of Diabetes and Carrie Keller are doing the JDRF Ride for the Cure to fundraise for JDRF and network for our department. We would love you to help sponsor us as we attempt an 80km ride!

    Please head to Terri's page if you can spare a few dollars for this great charity that in turn supports many people's research in the diabetes department. Please spread the word to family and friends! Link:

    https://jdrf-ride-2018.everydayhero.com/au/terri

    Many thanks, Terri Allen
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